Volume : 7, Issue : 8, AUG 2021

DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS: BUILDS BODY STRUCTURE BUT ALSO BREAKS

KUSHAL NANDI, PRITAM BAKSHI, GOURAV MITRA, DR. DHRUBO JYOTI SEN, DR. DHANANJOY SAHA

Abstract

Dietary supplement can be defined as any vitamin, mineral, amino acids, added chemical substances, animal derived or herbal products that is added to the diet to improve human health. Scientists and health professionals agree that dietary supplements can be under certain conditions beneficial to human health, but should not replace complete and balanced daily meals of foods which are necessary for a healthful diet. The most authoritative national agency U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) emphasized that “…unlike drugs, dietary supplements are not intended to treat, diagnose, prevent, or cure diseases. Dietary supplements should not make claims, such as “reduces pain” or “treats heart disease”, etc.…”. Globally, dietary supplement market stood at over US$90 billion in 2013, and on top is the US market with over 30 billion every year. For many years informed medical sources like doctors, nurses, pharmacists, nutritionists and medical authorities agree that there’s a lot of wrong information in the supplements market. Many dietary supplements, even in the USA that has some of the most experienced health agencies, managed to escape the safety tests, labeling and health regulations. From 2007, some of the most well-known scientists in the USA on nutrition, metabolism and epidemiology reviewed the evidence on multivitamin/mineral supplements and concluded that there was not sufficient evidence to recommend for or against for the prevention of chronic disease. Randomized Control Trials of dietary supplements increased substantially in the last decade in many developed countries. The results are mixed but the majority is negative for health benefits or for preventing diseases. In 2013 three papers and an overall review of the results for the last decade with the title “Enough is enough. Stop wasting money on vitamin and mineral supplements” was published in the prestigious medical journal Annals of Internal Medicine in the USA. The influence of these research results was spread to other developed countries and more critical appraisals were published on dietary supplements. This review article covers the most important aspects of dietary supplements, the trends in global market, the national and international regulations of various products. Also, examines the debate and arguments of health professionals. The review examines in a systematic way the most important studies that were published in the scientific literature in the last few years on the most widespread dietary supplements and their results on benefits or risk to human health. It covers dietary supplements taken by young, elderly, pregnant women, athletes and people with deficiencies which were self-prescribed and on the international market.

Keywords

DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS, BALANCER DIET, VITAMINS, MINERALS, RANDOMIZED CONTROL TRIALS, HEALTH BENEFIT, RISK, GLOBAL DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS MARKET.

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