Volume : 7, Issue : 8, AUG 2021

THE IMPACT OF DIGITAL LITERACY AS A LEARNING STRATEGY UNDER THE NEW NORMAL ON EDUCATION

*MARILYN M. MIRANDA, EMILY C. ROSAL, ROSE MAE N. LIGANIA, GENESA V. CADIZ, DARYLL N. VILLAFUERTE, VIRGINIA T. CA√ĎADILLA

Abstract

This review research contains different articles from different authors on the World Wide Web, focusing on the impact of digital literacy as a learning strategy in education. These articles are based on the following on teacher preparation (digital skills and knowledge) and student participation in digital technology The key point. Technology. This review shows that digital literacy has become an important part of teachers’ training for student learning as part of making education possible during a pandemic. The review showed that technical knowledge alone is not enough, but teachers need to innovate in learning activities by involving students so that they can apply these skills to solve accessibility gaps and modify the learning experience to meet the needs of students. Challenge. Distance learning. The results show that teachers and students need constant contact to know how to take full advantage of the benefits of technology (as part of a blended learning model) and how to use it effectively in our education system to create a real learning experience.

Keywords

DIGITAL LITERACY, DIGITAL COMPETENCE FRAMEWORK, DISTANCE LEARNING, LEARNING STRATEGY.

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