Volume : 3, Issue : 12, DEC 2017

THE DEVELOPMENT OF CHINESE VERSION OF SOCIAL COMPARISON SCALE AND THE EXPLORATION OF ITS MULTIPLE GROUP DIFFERENCE

YANG, LI-ZU

Abstract

Social comparison - how people use others to make sense of themselves - is a universal characteristic of humans. Social comparison could shape our thinking, our emotion, and our behavior. The concept of social comparison orientation (SCO) refers to individual difference in the inclination to compare one’s accomplishment, one’s situation, and one’s experiences with those of others. However, the tendency of social comparison differs from one individual to the next. The purpose of this study is to create a Chinese version of SCO and to investigate the current status of undergraduates on the social comparison orientation. Subjects consist of 533 college students who were administered three measures of social comparison scales, namely, general, upward and downward ones. The relationship of SCO with some important demographic variables is also explored. The characteristics of item parameters estimated by GPCM (Generalized Partial Credit Model) , and the multiple group analysis demonstrated by SEM (Structural Equation Model) are also discussed.

Keywords

SOCIAL COMPARISON ORIENTATION, ITEM RESPONSE THEORY, STRUCTURAL EQUATION MODEL.

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