Volume : 8, Issue : 3, MAR 2022

EFFECTIVENESS OF KALEIDOSCOPE ON PAIN AND ANXIETY LEVELS DURING INFERIOR ALVEOLAR NERVE BLOCK IN 6-9-YEAR-OLD CHILDREN

MILI KEVADIYAA*, ANUP PANDAB, MIRA VIRDAC, JINA JANID, BALRAJ SHUKLAE, JAY MEHTAF

Abstract

Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of distraction techniques using kaleidoscope in the management of pain and anxiety in 6-9-year-old children receiving inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB).

Methodology: Fifty children aged 6-9 years were screened to be included in the study who required dental treatment and had no prior history of dental treatment. A simple randomization technique utilizing a computer-generated lottery method was used to allocate the participants into an experimental and control group. The experimental group was distracted using kaleidoscope during the administration of local anesthesia whereas the control group did not receive any such intervention.

Results: Statistically significant reduction in the anxiety level was seen in children who received distraction (P <0.05). The pain levels of children in the experimental group reduced but was not statistically significant (p <0.22).

Conclusion: The distraction technique using kaleidoscope was an effective approach for reduction of pain and anxiety in children during inferior alveolar nerve block.

Keywords

DISTRACTION, KALEIDOSCOPE, PAIN, ANXIETY, INFERIOR ALVEOLAR NERVE BLOCK, LOCAL ANESTHESIA.

Article : Download PDF

Cite This Article

Article No : 4

Number of Downloads : 85

References

  1. A. Karakaya, D. G€ozen. (2016) The effect of distraction on pain level felt by school-age children during venepuncture procedure–randomized controlled trial, pain management nursing, 17 (1), p. 47–53
  2. American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD). (2015) Clinical Affairs Committee-Behavior Management Subcommittee, American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Guideline on Behavior Guidance for the Pediatric Dental Patient. Pediatric Dentistry;37, p. 57-70.
  3. Bieri, D., Reeve, R., Champion, G. D., Addicoat, L., & Ziegler, J. (1990). The Faces Pain Scale for the self-assessment of the severity of pain experienced by children: Development, initial validation and preliminary investigation for ratio scale properties. Pain, 41, p.139–150.
  4. Blount, R. L., Zempsky, W. T., Jaaniste, T., Evans, S., Cohen, L. L., Devine, K. A., et al. (2009). Handbook of pediatric psychology: In M. C. Roberts, & R. Steele (Eds.), Management of pain and distress due to medical procedures (4th ed.) New York: Guilford Press, pp. 171e188).
  5. Britannica, T. Editors of Encyclopaedia (2016). kaleidoscope. Encyclopaedia Britannica. Available at https://www.britannica.com/technology/kaleidoscope
  6. Bulut, M., Küçük Alemdar, D., Bulut, A., & Şalcı, G. (2020). The Effect of Music Therapy, Hand Massage, and Kaleidoscope Usage on Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting, Pain, Fear, and Stress in Children: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Journal of perianesthesia nursing: official journal of the American Society of PeriAnesthesia Nurses, 35(6), p.649–657.
  7. Carlson, K. L., Broome, M., & Vessey, J. A. (2000). Using distraction to reduce reported pain, fear, and behavioral distress in children and adolescents: a multisite study. Journal of the Society of Pediatric Nurses: JSPN, 5(2), p. 75–85.
  8. H.S. Hutchins Jr., F.A. Young, D.T. Lackland, C.P. Fishburne. (1997). The effectiveness of topical anesthesia and vibration in alleviating the pain of oral injections, Anesthesia progress, 44 (3), p. 87–89.
  9. IASP: International Association for the Study of Pain. (2001). Faces Pain Scale - Revised home. Available at http://www.iasp-pain.org/FPSR. Accessed on January 10, 2012 from IASP website
  10. Katz, N. (2002). The impact of pain management on quality of life. Journal of Pain Symptom Management, 24(Suppl. 1), p. S38-eS47
  11. N. Canbulat, S. Inal, H. S€onmezer. (2014) Efficacy of distraction methods on procedural pain and anxiety by applying distraction cards and kaleidoscope in children, Asian Nursing Research, 8 (1), p. 23–28.
  12. R.S.M. Costa, S.N. Ribeiro, E.D. Cabral. (2012) Determinants of painful experience during dental treatment, Rev Dor. São Paulo, 13 (4), p. 365–370.
  13. S.A. Abdelmoniem, S.A. Mahmoud. (2016) Comparative evaluation of passive, active, and passive-active distraction techniques on pain perception during local anesthesia administration in children. Journal of AdvancedResearch. 7 (3), p. 551–556.
  14. S. Nuvvula, S. Alahari, R. Kamatham, R.R. Challa. (2015) Effect of audiovisual distraction with 3D video glasses on dental anxiety of children experiencing administration of local analgesia: a randomised clinical trial, EuropeanArchives of PaediatricDentistry. 16 (1), p. 43–50.
  15. Taddio, A., Appleton, M., Bortolussi, R., Chambers, C., Dubey, V., Halperin, S., et al. (2010). Reducing the pain of childhood vaccination: An evidence-based clinical practice guideline. Canadian Medical Association Journal, 182(18), p. 43e55.
  16. Tüfekci, F. G., Celebio_glu, A., & Küçüko_glu, S. (2009). Turkish children loved distraction: Using kaleidoscope to reduce perceived pain during venepuncture. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 18(15), p. 2180e2186.
  17. Uman, L. S., Chambers, C. T., McGrath, P. J., & Kisely, S. (2006). Psychological interventions for needle-related procedural pain and distress in children and adolescents. Evidence-Based Child Health: A Cochrane Review Journal, 3(2), p. 323e 398.
  18. Venham LL, Gaulin-Kremer E. (1979) A self-report measure of situational anxiety for young children. Pediatric Dentistry, 1(2), p. 91-6.
  19. Vessey, J. A., Carlson, K. L., & McGill, J. (1994). Use of distraction with children during an acute pain experience. Nursing research, 43(6), p. 369–372.