Volume : 5, Issue : 9, SEP 2019

CLARIFYING SELF-REFLECTIONS ON THE ROLE OF TEACHERS AND TEACHING

TODD JOBBITT

Abstract

For teachers to better understand their own perspectives on teaching and how teaching processes in language learning classrooms can be practiced, it can be a vital necessity to occasionally pause and reflect on one’s teaching. Clarifying personal perspectives and how these may contribute to teacher development and teacher professional identity against a backdrop of modern professional teaching practices, competencies, and sub-competencies, can help one to understand the impact and significance of their role as both an individual teacher and as part of a teaching community. This author endeavors to show how his initial skill development practices as a beginning teacher helped him to create a stronger focus on the maintenance and growth of these skills, including reflective practice, in the language learning classroom as a continuing teacher and teacher-trainer. The author ends with some final thoughts and practical suggestions for enhancing one’s practices in this area.

Keywords

SELF-REFLECTION, REFLECTIVE PRACTICE, TEACHERS AND TEACHING, TEACHER PROFESSIONAL IDENTITY.

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Article No : 9

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